Glock Vs. Lone Wolf Barrel




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cartbon copy: thank you, was good info

Bhfeice Holder: in a sense, you could never use reloaded bullets in the lone wolf barrel.

Bhfeice Holder: wouldn't the standard barrel be good lets say in an survival situation where you had to scavenge for ammo that may have been reloaded? because those expanded rounds would not fit in the lone wolf where as they would fit in the standard glock barrel.

Giacomo C.: Did you polish the feed ramp on the Lone Wolf?  I received a Lone Wolf for a Glock 30 today.  They said in the description that it had a polished feed ramp.  It does not look polished to me.  A polished ramp should look like a mirror in my opinion.  The LW I got does not...not even close.

perikaveera: I'm no Glock fan here and I don't reload either but these are my reasons for Lone Wolf barrel. Bought a Glock20 in 10mm last year. 10mm because it's a hot/exotic/cool round and all that but it's also pricey and not easily available. Also, out of a factory barrel it can hurt your shooting hand especially your trigger finger. A Lone Wolf extended/ported barrel took care of that and far better accuracy for $125 extra. Another hot round is the .357Sig but that too is pricey and hard to find at your local ammo place. .40S&W is cheap and they're everywhere. So bought a LW .357Sig extended/ported for $125 and a LW .40S&W for $110. That's 3 calibers for the price of less than 2 and more shooting and practice options and the best part is that THE 10mm MAGAZINE IS GOOD FOR ALL THE THREE CALIBERS!
Jackson, Mississippi.

Eric Mayfield: Awesome video, I never heard of chamber support until recently and you clearly point it out. I was wondering if this phenomenon was the same in a clock 21(45cal)? If I reload for that will I need an aftermarket barrel? 

Bill M: We saw a lot of case head seps in Federal Hydra-shok in 1993-96 circa as Federal brass was made by a 2 step draw process. Federal's explanation is the case is meant to be fired one time and one time only.  There is a lot of that early .40SW brass still around. I witnessed more than 20 of these case head seps. Supposedly Federal corrected the problem but they could never recall all those cases and ammo. For what it's worth. 

Marty Abernathy: You did a fantastic job on this video explaining what a "fully supported chamber" was.  I am a big fan of Buffalo Bore ammo and is not recommended with factory .40 Glock barrels.  Great video

sniper244: That's why Glock gives a warning not to use reloaded ammunition...Simple fix.

svt283: Is a kkm better? Or lonewolf just as better?

Michael Clouser: nice job. good info. 

bsgautomobile: Great video... thanks...

extra .innings: excellent video, thank you:)  

elbertelrod: great video

asianredneck625: Very helpful 

BallisticianX: I can explain the technical reasons why if you reload you want to replace your factory barrel, it is not just because the polygonal rifling with the whole "can't use  cast or plated bullets in a Glock barrel" It has a lot to do with the case condition: All Glock barrels are designed with a protruding feed ramp to aid in reliable feeding. This design offers less case support than other manufacturers models. The larger chamber dimensions of the Glock is also for reliability in feeding. The base/ web area bulge issue is a direct result of the lack of chamber support. It is more common to the .40 than the 9mm. The .45 is the least as the standard operating pressure of the .45 ACP is much lower than the two latter thus less expansion potential. The bulge is a serious factor for reliability when the cases are reloaded as standard sizer dies cannot contact the case low enough to remove it and creates a bump stop to possibly stop the round short of fully chambering in a fully supported barrel such as Lone Wolf or KKM. It also posses a weak point for rupture when fired as a reload in an unsupported barrel, the condition to cause the "Glock caboom". Redding makes a sizing die specifically designed to remove the "bulge". I believe it's called the GRX die. It is designed to be used as a stand alone sizing operation on a single stage press. The case is actually pushed completely through the die from bottom to top to ensure full surface area sizing. You need to do it to safely and efficiently reload Glock .40 brass for use in any .40 chambered weapon. If your a reloader and want longer and safer case life it is a must to have a supported chamber and a touch tighter chamber. Simply rounds fired through a supported and tighter chamber expand less and wont bulge thus less material to displace when resizing them back to SAAMI dimensions., and no bulge hindering safety or reliability. All brass material will have a phenomenon called work hardening occur when constantly pressed or expanded under force. How quick or hard depends on frequency of the force applied and how much per instance. So the less it is moved per instance the slower the process takes to become a problem. Once a case is work hardened it loses ductility and increases density and is less likely to flex but rather crack. Now you increse rupture risks and another condition called spring back. This is when its to hard to be forced to a dimension and stay there but rather will expand back somewhat from the desired dimension applied to it from a loading die. This makes for oversized cases to increase feeding problems and less than optimal bullet tension for erratic pressures. All brass eventually should be retired but over expanded cases will have to be retired a lot sooner....not very economical.

Robert Watson: Few gun manufacturers were prepared for the IPSC phenomenon. Individual shooters routinely fired more ammo through any given firearm than some small police departments. Glock was no exception. They were developed as military sidearms and would never see the amounts of ammo a dedicated shooter would expend. The bulging issue would not be a factor for a military weapon since the empty cases would not be reloaded. 

Dixie Normus: Is this only for .40 s&w barrels or do Glock barrels do this in 9mm,10mm, .45 as well?

James Sorrentino: From a logical point of view, I tend to agree with you.  However, I have seen certain factory loads (Personal Defense) that won't chamber in the Lone Wolf barrel.  You want reliability and chambering of any ammo - Glock barrel.  Sticking to one type of ammo - Wolf barrel may be advantageous. The Glock is not dangerous.  It's the most widely used and most often fired pistol in the world.

usabirddog: thanks dude for the vid
Rating:
Glock Vs. Lone Wolf Barrel 5 out of 5

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Glock Vs. Lone Wolf Barrel